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If one allows a problem to endure for a month or a day, or even for a few minutes, it distorts the mind. So is it possible to meet a problem immediately without any distortion and be immediately, completely, free of it and not allow a memory, a scratch on the mind, to remain?

Freedom from the Known,93    
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LISTENING TO AYAHUASCA: New Hope for Depression, Addiction, PTSD, and Anxiety Rachel Harris [New World Library, 376 pages] Over the past decade, the psychoactive “plant medicine” Ayahuasca has continued to attract more and more attention worldwide. This interest has inspired several important books on the subject that have become seminal works in the area of scientific […]

Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
Original author: Contributing Writer
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Every problem is related to every other problem so that if you can solve one problem completely - it does not matter what it is- you will see that you are able to meet all other problems easily and resolve them. We are talking , of course, of psychological problems.

Freedom from the Known,93    
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In our weekly Mindful Dreams column, Aneta Baranek of the School of Metaphysics is offering free dream interpretations to The Mindful Word readers, as well as articles on dreams in general. If you’ve ever been curious about deciphering the cryptic contents of your subconscious mind, here’s your chance! If you would like Aneta to interpret […]

Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
Original author: Aneta Baranek
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In 2003, Tibetan lama Phakyab Rinpoche was admitted to the emergency clinic of the Program for Survivors of Torture at Manhattan’s Bellevue Hospital. After a dramatic escape from imprisonment in China, at the hands of authorities bent on uprooting Tibet’s traditional religion and culture, his ordeal had left him with life-threatening injuries, including gangrene of the right ankle. American doctors gave Rinpoche a shocking choice: accept leg amputation or risk a slow, painful death. An inner voice, however, prompted him to try an unconventional cure: meditation. He began an intensive spiritual routine that included thousands of hours of meditation over three years in a small Brooklyn studio. Against all scientific logic, his injuries gradually healed. In this vivid, passionate account, Sofia Stril-Rever relates the extraordinary experiences of Phakyab Rinpoche, who reveals the secret of the great healing powers that lie dormant within each of us.

We hope you’ll enjoy this excerpt from Meditation Saved My Life: A Tibetan Lama and the Healing Power of the Mind, in which Rinpoche shares his three great missions in life, as related by Sofia Stril-Rever

# # #


At dawn on the second day in Dharamsala, which rises in an exultation of golden and crimson shades, I recall Rinpoche’s words, twice repeated. The first time was when he asked me to write the story of his healing, and then again in New York six months ago: “I will be completely healed when you finish writing this book.”

Completely healed? What exactly does he mean? The answer comes at the end of our stay in Dharamsala.

We sit on a bench along the Lingkor, the ritual circumambulation path winding around Kundun’s residence, and we overlook the Kangra Valley as far as the eye can see. The path is bordered with devotion flags hanging from the treetops and prayer wheels that turn and ring a bronze bell. Tibetans of all ages walk up and down this road to receive the blessings of their charismatic leader, while the deep voices of the monastic college of Namgyal resonate, with cymbals, drums, horns, and bone flutes. It is the sixth lunar month, and the monks are performing the great Chakrasamvara ritual. They are creating its sand-colored mandala, which is the basis of the tsa-lung practice that allowed Rinpoche to heal. Finishing the book here makes sense. We are back where it all started.

For a new start.

“I have three great missions in this life,” Rinpoche tells me, looking introspective. “First, as a human being. Second, as a teacher of Dharma. Third, as a lama, holder of a lineage. As a human being, at the age of thirteen, I offered my life to the service of all beings. In my experience of the world, I have therefore adopted an open-minded, trustful, and spontaneously welcoming attitude toward all those who cross my path through maturation of karma. Nobody I meet is foreign to me. In each one, I find my brothers and sisters in humanity. As human beings, we all have within us the jewel of awakened mind, which is our extraordinary potential for kindness and inner transformation. 

“At the basis of my teachings, there is the opening of the heart, and I endeavor to introduce my students into the mind’s spacious states, which encompass the universes and all beings. Meditating on the opening of the heart concerns everyone, Buddhists as well as non-Buddhists, for it nurtures the fundamental human values of love, benevolence, compassion, forgiveness, human rights, and reconciliation. Without an opening of the heart, our ethics remain unembodied and can very well veer toward intolerance. Taking the path of the heart always helps us recognize the potential for kindness and transformation that is a feature of our humanity. If we have developed unconditional love, we will recognize this loving basis even in the cruelest among us, who act inhumanly because they ignore their true nature. Opening the heart makes us love beings so much that every day we renew our ever-keener longing to help them, so that they may find happiness and be delivered from suffering. . . .”  

Rinpoche continues, “As a master of Dharma, I have a second mission. It is also in the realm of suffering, not suffering on a relative level this time, but on an ultimate level, the very causes of suffering. The root cause of all our pains is fundamental ignorance. Our erroneous understanding of reality maintains destructive states of mind, such as hatred, attachment, desire, jealousy, and anger. These emotions carry on the cycle of suffering and make us turn our backs on happiness. My mission is therefore to unceasingly provide the teachings that deliver us from ignorance by conquering our inner enemies. Believing in adversity is a terrible illusion. The enemies that appear outside of us are the projections of our uncontrolled mind. When we have overcome all our inner demons, nothing can affect us anymore. . . .”  

“And at last,” Rinpoche says, “I have a third mission, as the holder of a lineage. Acknowledged as the eighth Phakyab Rinpoche, I must preserve a spiritual filiation and carry on the memory of my lineage, of these extraordinary teachers who made the offerings of all their lives to all beings before me. For I am the holder of the throne of Ashi Monastery, blessed by the heart relics of Je Tsongkhapa, which some Tibetans saved from destruction by the Red Guards at the peril of their lives. In the past few years, thanks to the generosity of my students, I have been able to rebuild Je Tsongkhapa’s chapel, and soon I hope to be able to set up a patronage program to ensure a sufficient amount of daily food for the monks of Ashi.”

It is unthinkable for Rinpoche to fail his duty as safeguard of the sacred heritage of his lineage, no less precious than his own life. I am moved as he mentions his spiritual inheritance in front of the residence of the Dalai Lama, who, in the inextricable nebula of karmic causes and effects, acknowledged him twenty years earlier as the eighth reincarnation of a great lineage. 

We lift up our heads to the rustle of wings. A hawk flies in circles over us. Is it here to seal Rinpoche’s words with the stamp of promise, the promise that he will unfailingly achieve the three great missions of his life?

“Thank you, Sofia, for having written my story,” Phakyab Rinpoche says. “I am thus totally healed because everything, everything has been put into action. With this book, and in accordance with Kundun’s message, which I received eleven years ago on my hospital bed, the time has come for me to teach the world how to heal.”

# # #

Phakyab Rinpoche, abbot of Ashi Monastery in Tibet, was recognized as a Reincarnate Lama by the Dalai Lama in 1994. A member of the Gelugpa order of Tibetan Buddhism, Rinpoche teaches spiritual healing throughout the United States, France, and the world. Find him online at www.phakyabrinpoche.org.

Sofia Stril-Rever is a spiritual teacher and writer based in Paris, France, dedicated to the promotion of inner healing, peace, and universal responsibility. She has coauthored three books with the Dalai Lama, and released a CD of healing mantras.

Excerpted from the book Meditation Saved My Life. Copyright © 2014 by Le Cherche Midi Éditeur. English-language copyright © 2017 by New World Library. 

Original author: Publicity Admin
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Only when we understand the true relationship between each other is there a possibility of love, and love is denied when we have images. Therefore it is important to understand, not intellectually but actually in your daily life, how you have built images about your wife, your husband, your neighbour, your child, your country, your leaders, your politicians, your gods - you have nothing but images.

Freedom from the Known,92    
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America’s Constitution and potential for “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness,” living in the “land of the free and the home of the brave,” has been a work in progress for more than 240 years. Throughout our history, we’ve fallen far short of these ideals. Not all have experienced a life of liberty and […]

Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
Original author: Contributing Writer
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When I say I know you, I mean I knew you yesterday. I do not know you actually now. All I know is my image of you. That image is put together by what you have said in praise of me or to insult me, what you have done to me- it is put together by all the memories I have of you- and your image of me is put together in the same way, and it is those images which have relationship and which prevent us from really communing with each other.

Freedom from the Known,92    
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In our weekly Psychological & Spiritual Therapy column, therapist Jack Surguy is offering professional advice to The Mindful Word readers for all those questions and problems you have wanted to discuss with someone qualified and caring. If you would like Jack to assist you in any areas of your life and relationships, fill out this […]

Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
Original author: Jack Surguy
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Over the past five years, in the first study of its kind, linguist Lisa Smartt has collected accounts of the final words of over 1,500 people who were a few hours to a few weeks from dying. One of the outcomes of this collected research is her new book, Words at the Threshold: What We Say as We’re Nearing Death. In this expansive conversation with host Kim Corbin, Lisa decodes the symbolism of those last words, showing how the language of the dying points the way to a transcendent world beyond our own.You can tune in and listen to this great conversation directly on Unity Online Radio, iTunes, Stitcher, Soundcloud, or YouTube, and if you enjoy this podcast, please feel free to leave a five-star rating and review on iTunes.For more discussion with other listeners and fans after the show, we invite you to join the New World Now podcast community on Facebook.
Original author: Publicity Admin
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It is only when we see without any preconception, any image, that we are able to be in direct contact with anything in life. All our relationships are really imaginary - that is based on an image formed by tought.

Freedom from the Known,91    
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The following has been excerpted from The Reducetarian Solution: How the Surprisingly Simple Act of Reducing the Amount of Meat in Your Diet Can Transform Your Health and The Planet, a collection of more than 70 essays on reducing our meat intake, edited by Brian Kateman. This selection is by Ginny Messina. Introducing your family to […]

Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
Original author: Contributor
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Posted by on in Krishnamurti (RSS feed)

Beauty lies in the total abandonment of the observer and the observed and there can be self-abandonment only when there is total austerity.

Freedom from the Known,91    
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All ideas are mind-made concepts All our thoughts and ideas about mindfulness are mind-made concepts and ideas that have nothing whatsoever to do with mindful awareness. All ideas are mind-made concepts. A thought turns into an idea, which turns into a belief. Whatever you think about mindfulness, you’re believing your own ideas about it, which […]

Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
Original author: Mike Larcombe
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So long as we ourselves are confused, small, petty, whatever our activity may be, and whatever concept we may have of truth, of God, of beauty or love, our thinking and our action are bound to be equally petty, confused, limited. A confused mind can only think in terms of confusion. A petty mind can never imagine what God is, what truth is, and yet that is what we are occupied with. So it seems to me important to discover whether the mind can transform itself without any compulsion, without any motive. The moment there is compulsion, the mind is already conforming to a pattern. If there is a motive for change, that motive is self-projected; therefore, the change, being a product of self-centered activity, is no change at all. It seems to me that this is the real thing which we have fundamentally to tackle, put our teeth into -and not whom to follow, who is the best leader, and all that rubbish.

Hamburg 1956,Talk 6    
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Question: Most of us are caught up in and are bored with the routine of our work, but our livelihood depends on it. Why can we not be happy in our work?

Krishnamurti: Surely, modern civilization is making many of us do work which we as individuals do not like at all. Society as it is now constituted, being based on competition, ruthlessness, war, demands, let us say, engineers and scientists; they are wanted everywhere throughout the world because they can further develop the instruments of war and make the nation more efficient in its ruthlessness. So education is largely dedicated to building the individual into an engineer or a scientist, whether he is fit for it or not. The man who is being educated as an engineer may not really want to be one. He may want to be a painter, a musician, or who knows what else. But circumstances -education, family tradition, the demands of society, and so on- force him to specialize as an engineer. So we have created a routine in which most of us get caught, and then we are frustrated, miserable, unhappy for the rest of our lives. We all know this.

Hamburg 1956,Talk 5,    
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“Flunking” out of daycare Marilyn Goldstein wasn’t off to a great start in her academic career. She managed to repeatedly flunk out of daycare. No one liked her. She didn’t play well with the other children. She was withdrawn. Although the term “antisocial” hadn’t yet been coined, Marilyn could’ve been an example cited in child […]

Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
Original author: Contributor
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In our weekly Mindful Dreams column, Aneta Baranek of the School of Metaphysics is offering free dream interpretations to The Mindful Word readers, as well as articles on dreams in general. If you’ve ever been curious about deciphering the cryptic contents of your subconscious mind, here’s your chance! If you would like Aneta to interpret […]

Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
Original author: Aneta Baranek
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In this 53-minute dharma talk from the Upper Hamlet of Plum Village, Thay teaches a message of love. The date is Sunday, November 12, 2006. We begin with two chants from the monastics.

You are a continuation of your father. Intellectually we know this to be true. And yet we feel that we are different. It is because you have a notion of your father – you haven’t looked deeply enough at your father. Who is the father inside of you? Can you practice for your father? Transformation of your father inside of you also helps to transform the father on the outside.

How can you can get in better touch with your father? First, we need to be aware. Thay shares about how he practiced regarding his own father. Creating a conversation with your father can occur anytime, whether they are alive or not.

The same practice can apply to your mother. Begin a conversation with your mother inside of you. And if she is still alive, you can talk with her too. Thay offers specific.

You also have a spiritual teacher inside of you who is also outside of you. How are you carrying your teacher into the future? How is your teacher evolving inside of you? How are you practicing for your teacher? We should not be exactly like our teacher. We should learn and transform for the time. To see the suffering of our time.

The Buddha of our Time. A global ethic. To be able to respond to globalization, the environment, and other present needs.

When you contemplate an orange, you see everything about the orange. The universal aspect of the orange. Harmony. We need a global ethic to look at something like globalization. The global ethic manifests through the Five Mindfulness Trainings. This is the path to take up and they are presenting in a non-sectarian way and it’s nature is universal. You don’t have to be a Buddhist. You can remain yourself but you can create harmony, sisterhood, brotherhood. The Five Mindfulness Trainings are the way out of difficult situations. They may also be inherent in other traditions and people are encouraged to look and discover this too.

We conclude with Thay sharing a short story of the Buddha. Seeing with the eyes of the Buddha. Contemplating the beauty of the world.

1:45 Bell and Chanting
10:30 Continuation of your Father
29:15 Continuation of your Teacher
36:15 The Buddha of our Time
39:20 Global Ethic: Five Mindfulness Trainings
51:30 Returning to our Ancestors

If you are able to support this project financially, please visit our account on Patreon where you can make a donation for as little as $1 per dharma talk.

The post Continuing our Spiritual and Blood Ancestors appeared first on Thich Nhat Hanh Dharma Talks.

Original author: Chan Niem Hy
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So what is it that most of us are afraid of? There are superficial fears, such as the fear of losing a job, and so on, but to those fears we can generally adjust ourselves. If you lose your job, you will find some other way of making a living. The great fear is not for one's social security; it lies much deeper than that. And I do not know if the mind is willing to look at itself so profoundly as to be able to find out for itself what it is intrinsically frightened of. Unless you discover for yourself the deep source of your fear, all efforts to escape from fear, all cultivation of virtue, and so on is of no avail because fear is at the root of most of our anxious urges. So can we find out what it is we are afraid of, each one of us? Is the cause of fear common to us all, like death? Or is it something that each one of us has to discover, look at, go into for himself?

Hamburg 1956,Talk 5    
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